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Kingdom: Fungi
Phylum: Basidiomycota
Class: Agaricomycetes
Order: Agaricales
Family: Cortinariaceae
Genus: Galerina
Species: G. austrocalyptrata

This is one of the small brown found on moss coved logs or soil. Identifying these is difficult there been at lest four different species in New Zealand this is the only one that's easy to name due to the appearance of the spores.




Kingdom: Fungi
Phylum: Basidiomycota
Class: Basidiomycetes
Order: Agaricales
Family: Tricholomataceae
Genus: Gliophorus
Species: G. lilacinoides

This is an unusal colour for this species with an Earth Tongue (Trichoglossum hirsutum) growing amoung them.



Gliophorus lilacipes
Kingdom: Fungi
Phylum: Basidiomycota
Class: Basidiomycetes
Order: Agaricales
Family: Tricholomataceae
Genus: Gliophorus
Species: G. lilacipes

These Gliophorus are suffering from a change to the environment, typical of this group of waxgills these have a glutinous cap and stalk. If weather conditions change or the wind gets up then this glutinous material dries out giving a ripple effect over the surface.




Kingdom: Fungi
Phylum: Basidiomycota
Class: Basidiomycetes
Order: Boletales
Family: Coniophoraceae
Genus: Podoserpula
Species: P. pusio var. tristis

A very distinctive species with it delicate multi layered cap making it easy to identify, under the cap it has large pale pink blunt spines. Found growing from the side of decaying wood in small troops of 3 to 5 fruiting body's or in the case of this photo from the top of buried moss covered wood. These were until recently an uncommon species but are turning up more often recently.





Kingdom: Fungi
Phylum: Basidiomycota
Class: Basidiomycetes
Order: Agaricales
Family: Tricholomataceae
Genus: Mycena
Species: M. austrororida

This relatively common species can be found at the beginning of the season after heavy rain growing from large decaying tea tree logs. Easily recognised by its very glutinous stipe and dry brown to pallid cap this photo shows a group of immature fruiting body's.





Kingdom: Fungi
Phylum: Basidiomycota
Class: Basidiomycetes
Order: Boletales
Family: Boletaceae
Genus: Austroboletus
Species: A. lacunosus

With another fungi season now slowly creeping up on us this species has been turning up in large numbers. Its one of two species with a reticulated stipe so is easily recognised the other A. niveus is has a white fruiting body and different shaped spores.





Kingdom: Protista
Phylum: Myxomycota
Class: Myxomycetes
Order: Stemonitales
Family: Stemonitidaceae
Genus: Stemonaria
Species: S. longa


For something a little different I have show a myxomycetes or slime mould if you prefer the common name for this organism. Although its not a fungus these are usually studied by mycologist due to a similarity in reproduction e.g. by spores. This photo Stemonaria longa is from the only second collection found in New Zealand making it an uncommon species although it does not fit the official description very well.





Kingdom: Fungi
Phylum: Basidiomycota
Class: Basidiomycetes
Order: Agaricales
Family: Tricholomataceae
Genus: Gliophorus
Species: G. pallidus

G. pallidus can sometimes be a difficult species to name to the extent that an Australian mycologist has combined this with the green wax gill Gliophorus graminicolor. I personal don't agree with this as I have never seen a pale G. graminicolor or a G. pallidus with any green colouring. When young G. pallidus has an orange tint and as it matures this fades to cream or an off white some times with pink tinges as in the photo above. With a depressed centre to the cap and decurrent gills its not to difficult to name once you are comfortable with the colour range. Unfortunately there are a couple of similar undescribed species that turn up from time to time that can cause confusion.





Kingdom: Fungi
Phylum: Basidiomycota
Class: Basidiomycetes
Order: Agaricales
Family: Tricholomataceae
Genus: Gliophorus
Species: G. graminicolor

Of the two described species of green Gliophorus this one is usually the lest common in the Auckland region that was till last year when nearly all the green ones that turned up were this species. The nice reticulated texture to the cap is the result of environmental effects. Typical of the Gliophorus species these have a glutinous cap and stalk and in dry weather the glutinous material dries out. I this case the material has formed a lovely reticulated pattern. This species also does not seem to hold its colour well and can be often be seen to have faded around the edges of the cap.





Kingdom: Fungi
Phylum: Ascomycota
Class: Ascomycetes
Order: Helotiales
Family: Helotiaceae
Genus: Ascocoryne
Species: A. sarcoides

This cup fungus is a little odd in having two different forms. When sexual reproduction occurs it forms a cup like structure or as in the case above a stalked structure. When asexual reproduction occurs (which is effectively a clone of its self) then it forms a stalked structure. In all forms it is still deep purple in colour the cups are up to 15 mm in diameter while the stalked structure are 10 mm high.





Kingdom: Fungi
Phylum: Basidiomycota
Class: Basidiomycetes
Order: Polyporales
Family: Steccherinaceae
Genus: Antrodiella
Species: A. Junghuhnia

This wood decay bracket fungus which is common on large logs is recognised by its short blunt spines. Fruiting body's can also form rosettes 60 mm in diameter or lay flat on the surface much depending on what part of the log they grow on.





Kingdom: Fungi
Phylum: Basidiomycota
Class: Basidiomycetes
Order: Agaricales
Family: Marasmiaceae
Genus: Favolaschia
Species: F. calocera

Of the four species of Favolaschia found in New Zealand all are saprophytic that is grow on dead plant material. Are brightly coloured or white with the lower surface being honeycomb with deep cavities and having white spores. F. calocera is an introduced tropical species believed from Madagascar has now spread throughout the North Island and much of the South Island. In resent time this species has now found its way to Australia believed on rotten wooden pellets.





Kingdom: Fungi
Phylum: Basidiomycota
Class: Basidiomycetes
Order: Agaricales
Family: Tricholomataceae
Genus: Gliophorus
Species: G. lilacinoides

Taken in the Kauri forest up the road from workman track on our last club foray to this location, been a typical waxgill with its small size and bright colours. The members of the Gliophorus genus are recognised but a glutinous cap and stipe and in some species a glutinous edge on the gills.



Plectania species

Kingdom: Fungi
Phylum: Ascomycota
Class: Ascomycetes
Order: Pezizales
Family: Sarcosomataceae
Genus: Plectania
Species: Not named

This cup fungus is one of several black cup fungi that have never been named this one in particular is very common. Found almost exclusively on tea tree often when still standing or held off the ground by other forest derby. When found on top of wood these have a very short stalk but when growing from the side it can have a stalk up to 40 mm long.